A Closer Look at What Happens After You Receive a Brown Envelope [infographic]

HomeBlogA Closer Look at What Happens After You Receive a Brown Envelope [infographic]

As a real estate broker, you know just how exciting and fulfilling it can be to help people buy and sell homes. But when you face allegations of improper behavior, fraud, or negligence and receive a brown envelope from the Real Estate Commission, you want to know what happens next, so you can protect your broker’s license and reputation. Legal representation is key to successfully navigating the process.

A Closer Look at What Happens After You Receive a Brown Envelope [infographic]

1. You receive a brown envelope—You will receive a brown envelope from the Real Estate Commission when a complaint has been filed against you or if the Commission has become privy to information that needs to be investigated about your brokerage practices.

2. You consult an attorney— It is critical to contact an attorney immediately after receiving a brown envelope, because they can help you respond appropriately and guide you through the process. Once you contact us to provide legal representation, we will work tirelessly to establish a fair or favorable outcome for you as you fight to prevent the loss or suspension of your broker’s license and fight the claims against you.

3. You respond in writing—You have 14 days after you receive your brown envelope letter to respond with your version of the facts about what occurred in relation to the investigation. If the letter requests copies of various documents, you must provide these with your response.

4. You undergo commission reviews—Once you provide documentation and a response defending your actions, the Real Estate Commission will review your case. A field investigation may also be conducted at this point that involves witness interviews, trust account audits, or the examination of evidence that cannot be easily identified.

5. You face several outcomes—Once the commission reviews all necessary and applicable evidence, they decide whether to take disciplinary action, dismiss your case with a warning, or conditionally dismiss your case. Your willingness to accept responsibility for what occurred can significantly impact the outcome of the disciplinary proceeding.